Five Questions: Alexia

Five Questions - Alexia

Meet Alexia.

What is your greatest accomplishment?

The art gallery that I own. It’s such a great thing to help the young artists become something more. And just to give them the idea how to follow their dreams. And—because, you know, there are many poor students who, like, wanna be a master, wanna get a master degree in fine arts, but they can’t find a good job or they can’t realize it themselves because… Our thing, as I said to you today earlier, it’s very overrated nowadays. And it’s like, it’s hard to find the right way to sell your paintings, so we’re helping those young people, young students, and make the exhibition for them and just give them the opportunity to grow with us. I was myself like that. And I found the person to help me out and now I’m just trying to give the chance to other people. To do that.

Who is the most important person in your life?

Oh absolutely my father no doubt. He did everything for me. He’s like—he’s my teacher, he’s my master, I can say because he always told like to invest in myself and my knowledge. That’s gonna be the most, best investment in my life. And the more I’m getting older, the more I’m realizing that it’s so true. 

Is there a moment in your life that you wish you could change?

You know, I’ve been thinking about it a lot. And…probably, maybe because now I’m in this kind of a state that I really appreciate all experiences I have and had in my life and it just, no regrets for anything. I mean, because all the things was kind of a learning experience. Bad, good ones, but still. It was just, I appreciate all things and all people that happen in my life. Some bad ones, some good ones because I learned a lot. I wouldn’t have become this person that I am now without all this things that happened in the past. So absolutely no regrets, no. 

What’s the most memorable pain you’ve ever felt?

Gosh. Painful thing. Um. It’s probably… Hidden lie? From the people I wouldn’t expect. But again, no regrets. That was another learning experience, but that was very painful. That was probably because… That was something that I didn’t expect completely at that age, and I was very young. I was like twenty-two or something. And I was very naive and very passionate about things that I wanna do in life and all things like that. And also very trustful to other people. So I trusted a lot to other people. I just gave them—well, I was open hearted, completely. And they just, not betrayed, but they just did something that actually wasn’t, ah, probably, nice, I guess. You could say that. That’s not a good word. Anyway… [Laughs] That was fucking painful, really! Yeah. It’s something very personal and intimate, but at the same time I can say that probably sometimes you just need to go through that shock, and the earlier the better because then you will learn from it and you will probably be more careful? Well, I’m not—I’m not saying I’m completely closed now from people or something, no. I’m just trying probably, not to reveal to strangers or to other people too much. And also trust my gut more than I used to. And I was very young, so that’s understandable, that happens probably. But for those peoples who probably will experience—because probably in our lives, happening something like that. I just wanna say that… That’s cool. The earlier the better. Just overcome it, [get over] it, and that’s it. And you’ll be good.

What will you miss the most when you’re gone?

I thought you were gonna ask, “What are you gonna ask God when you’re gonna be there?” Or something. [Laughs] All right... What am I gonna miss the most? That’s a tough one. Never thought about it. But. Probably gonna miss life as it is. Just all this colorful things. All this bad and good things. Because I don’t know what’s gonna be there. I mean nothing? Maybe something? You never know. I think it depends on what you believe in or whatever. But I mean, life is just damn good. It’s just great. You’re supposed to live it. As if every day is our last day. This way you’re gonna remember a lot of things and have these memories—and I’ll be glad to die with these memories like, “I fucking did it.” You know? It was in my life, no regrets. There was something very, not boring, there was something cool and worth to say to your grandkids and to your…other people. So just—just life, I guess.

Steve Molterart, family, dad, 1-30